Hannah Ord

 

 

Hannah's collection of body adornments feature in short films focusing upon the relationship between the wearer and the environment, becoming conscious of the elements of bodily restriction and how this can shift the body’s response to an environment.

She questions whether any type of female body art is only an investigation of the surface, and if erotic representations of the female nude even be it by a feminist artist, provokes voyeurism and the male gaze.

The methodology of the way she works to create, film, and preserve her objects through semi-perminant performance represents how ritual has become part of her practise, a typically ‘feminine way of working’ both inside and outside of the art world.

As part of domestic life women repeat housework duties daily, and also in lower paid jobs such as factories or shops the work is also repetitive, this conformity to ritual creating order also relating to the traditional view of female passiveness. Her work attempts to deconstruct the ideal image of femininity by altering the dominant view of the female body as an object of patriarchal society.

Hannah is aware that through the use of metaphor, irony, and the subject matter itself her work is direct and has a feminist agenda. Research into modern attitudes to feminism by directing interviews and reading other sources made her feel strongly that there is still a need to break the taboo of the f word. Shes wants people to realise it is possible to be both feminine and feminist.

An interest in the history of fashion first influenced her theme of restricting the body for the purpose of creating idealistic beauty through the use of corsets and crinolines. Looking forward to modern comparisons such as high heels and false eyelashes it was this questioning why women adorn themselves and transform their bodies to be beautiful that inspired her art practise.

Whilst using mirrors in the filming process it was here a connection was made between bodily adornment and deeper aspect of self- examination to video; the relationship between the body, performance, and the stereotype of typical female narcissism.